Saturday, June 02, 2007

Hey that looks like a ...

I've driven by it a gazillion times, but finally looked ... really looked. It is right on the main road going into town, just a few blocks from WalMart.



Surely, that's not what I think it is ...



Well, wadda' ya know? It's not even painted on. That is actually a part of the stone.

12 comments:

Summer said...

Yep.

I've thought about taking a picture of it, but its not really something I want a picture of.

Hillary said...

uuhh... wow.

Gayle said...

Is the building vacant? If so... go turn it into a flower? ha! Actually, it would be intersting to know the history behind it? Was it some sick joke, or some freaky accidnet? Go detective Christine!!!

Summer M said...

Hey you! I tagged you!

http://www.momisteaching.com/ive-been-tagged/

Anonymous said...

The swastika (from Sanskrit svástika स्वास्तिक ) is an equilateral cross with its arms bent at right angles, in either right-facing (卐) or left-facing (卍) forms. The term is derived from Sanskrit svasti, meaning well-being. The Thai greeting sawasdee is from the same root, carrying the same implication.

It is a widely-used symbol in Dharmic religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism). Hindus often decorate the swastika with a dot in each quadrant. In India, it is common enough to be a part of several Devanagari fonts. It is also a symbol in the modern unicode. It is often imprinted on religious texts, marriage invitations, decorations etc. It is used to mark religious flags in Jainism and to mark Buddhist temples in Asia.

Archaeological evidence of swastika shaped ornaments goes back to the Neolithic period. In 1920 the swastika was appropriated as a Nazi symbol, and has since then become a controversial motif as a consequence. In the Western world, it is this usage as a symbol of Nazism that is most familiar, and this political association has largely eclipsed its historical status in the East.

Paul said...

I don't care about the symobl's "historical status." It's just offensive to most. Whether it's a symbol of Nazism or the Arian Brotherhood, the symbol is a symbol of hate. I'm surprised there isn't a confederate flag in the window.

Anonymous said...

So why is a confederate flag associated with a symbol of hate? You need a history lesson.

Christine said...

Riiiiggghhhhtttt. I bet that's just a Hindu out here in the middle of northern Oklahoma ... wishing people "well being" as they drive by! Silly me.

Don't worry guys, I don't know how long it will take to meet/learn and understand the story to this family, but it will happen eventually. Probably won't be taking my black daughter with me the first time I visit! :)

Anonymous said...

How long has that been there? Perhaps the family living there was a victim of vandalism?

Maybe you could get a big group of people together to go there and say that you're sorry to see that someone did that to their wall and then ask if they need help painting over it (this would be especially great if they were NOT victims of vandalism) :)

The whole thing really freaks me out.

Christine said...

Like I said - it's actually a part of the outside of the house - brick inlaid in that design. Anything but vandalism!

Summer said...

Well I've lived here for 15 years and its always been there. So unless 16 years ago some kids snuck up in the middle of the night, on the main and heavily lit/driven road and managed to tear apart and rebuild their wall without making a sound I kind of doubt it was vandalism. But I guess anything is possible.

Anonymous said...

Oh sorry, didn't read that bit about it being inlaid. That's really crazy.

So, how old do you think the house is?